Walter L. Dutton - Writer - Teacher
Writing to enjoy reading.
Home
Personal Essays
About Us
Contact Us
Critical Thinking
Thinking Process
Textual Analysis
Pre Writing
Organizing Your Essay
Writing the Essay
Article Analysis
Analyzing Fiction
Argumentative & Analytical Essays
Research
Revision
Disclaimer
Native American Culture
Brain Injuries
Education
Brain Structure
ADA Accommodations
Narrative Therapy
Talk Therapy
Success
Step by Step Success
PTSD & TBI/ABI
ABI/TBI Links
Family History
Family History II
Memoir
Books by Our Authors
Genealogy I
Genealogy II
Genealogy III
History & Genealogy

Genealogy II


Grandson

On the maternal side of my family history, Nebraska and Iowa, bread basket states of the mid-west, feature prominently. The farmers of the mid-west, whether Duttons, Lunds, Mitchells, or Johnsons, were hardy people. They came to Nebraska and Iowa from Pennsylvania, Ohio, Virginia, and other eastern states. The withstood the harsh winters of the mid-west, which brought blizzards that sometimes left snow depths of twelve feet. In those weeks, the fire never stopped burning in the fireplaces, the only source of warmth. Barns were warmed by bales of hay stacked against the walls, creating great danger if an oil lamp should fall or be kicked. Not having medicines for colds, pneumonia, bronchitis and other common ailments, the sufferers sometimes died. Infants and small children were especially at risk.

My mother's paternal grandfather was Elof Elias Lund, born in Sweden, 3 May, 1866, who died in York, York Co., Nebraska, 4 July, 1934. He and his family of children, grandchildren and great grandchildren were at a city park celebrating Independence Day when he died suddenly from a heart attack. Elof had married Clara Josephine Johnson, born in Sweden, 11 December, 1868, and who passed away 9 October, 1930, in York, Nebraska. The Swedish State Lutheran Church had since the early 1600s mandated "household examinations" to ensure that the king and church knew who lived in each home, what they did as work and it controlled the rights of citizens to marry, vote, move within the county much less between counties, change occupations, and to emigrate. John E. Lund chose the Lund last name upon his departure from Sweden for reasons no one alive knows. His name was Johansson (John) Erlandsson (Erland's son). His father was Erland Johanson and his mother, Kerstin Andersdotter, married June 10, 1827, in Ranneslove, Halland County, Sweden. Johanna Lund (nee Benson) was born Johanna Bengtsdotter, Junr 7, 1838, to father Bengt Pahlsson and Hedwig Torstensdotter at Hasslov, Halland County. Hasslov and Ranneslov are nearby geographically. Elof's name on departure from Sweden was Olof Johanisson Erlandsson.

 

 
Elof Lund

 
Clara J. Lund nee Johnson

 

Elof's father, John E. Lund (b. 25 December 1840, Sweden, d. 20 Sept. 1907, Gresham, Nebraska) brought Elof with him, emigrating from Sweden when Elof was eight years old. John also brought with him his wife, Johannah Benson, b. 7 June 1828, Sweden, d. 2 May 1914, Gresham, Nebraska), and three other children. They had several children: Elof, Charles E. (1862-1895), Christine E. (1864-1957), Hilda E. (1867-1935), and Albert Leonard (1872-1893).

Elof and Clara, farming in the York County area, gave home to several children: Alice, Clarence, John Archie (1892-1984), Walter Leonard (my maternal grandfather) (1893-1975), Nellie Blanche (1898-1993), and George (1905-1950). While they were farming in Nebraska, Ora B. Canfield (b. 28 May 1860, Ustick, Illinois, d. 10 Oct. 1919, Benedict, Nebraska) married Ethel Lynn Hollinshead (b. July, 1859, Ustick, Illinois, d. 3 July 1901, Ustick, Ill.). Ethel's first and only child was Dorothy Jeanette Canfield (b. 1 Oct. 1900, Ustick, Ill., d. July 1994, Zearing, Iowa). Because Ora was unable to care for a child by himself, Dorothy Jeanette was adopted as a newborn infant by Charles Byron Mitchell and Ella Mae Mitchell nee Brown of York, Nebraska. Charles B. Mitchell was a farmer and York deputy sheriff then city police officer for his career. Dorothy Jeanette never knew her biological mother, who died within a year and a half of her birth. However, her biological father remarried and had other children, none of whom she knew.

It is only right to discuss Dorothy Jeanette's adopted family first, because they are the only parents and family she knew and whose name she was given. I have traced the Mitchell family to a Thomas Mitchell (b. 1560, Halifax, England, d. 1588 in Halifax). He was my 12th Great Grandfather. Another generation was English then two were in Scotland. From Scotland, William Mitchell was born in New Jersey after his father, Nathaniel, emigrated to the U.S. The Mitchells moved often and each successive grandfather was born in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Ohio, Ohio (James Mitchell, b. 13 June 1845, Cadiz, Ohio, d. 10 July 1919, York, Nebraska), then Iowa and to Nebraska. My Great Grandfather, Charles Byron Mitchell, was born in Boone, Boone Co. Iowa, 24 Sept., 1870, d. 17 Dec., 1933, in York, Nebraska. Charles B. Mitchell married Ella Mae Brown on 30 Dec., 1897, and they lived in the York Co., Nebraska, area for their lifetimes.

My grandmother, Dorothy Jeanette Mitchell, grew up in Nebraska until she married a local young man, Walter Leonard Lund, at age 20 years at the home of her parents, C.B. and Ella Mae Mitchell, on his farm 12 miles northwest of York, NE, at noon. The news article about the wedding sayd that she wore a "... gown of white French shadow organdie trimmed with valenciennes lace, and a orange bouguet." About sixty family and friends were present. She and my grandfather lived on his farm near York, NE, until they purchased a new farm near Zearing, Story Co., Iowa. Before moving to Iowa, they had three children, Walter L. Lund Jr., Dorothy Virginia Lund (my mother, 1922-1988), and Bernice Audrey Lund (1924-1924) who died at 3 and 1/2 months of the whooping cough and pneumonia. I have seen close friends grieve over the loss of an infant before and I have seen too much death; and yet I cannot imagine the depth of grief that must exist when one loses a baby and sister to any cause.

 

 
Ethel Canfield
Died 1901
Illinois

 
Walter L. Lund at 4 yrs

 
Walter L Lund, Walter L> Lund Jr.,
Dorothy Virgina Dutton nee Lund,
Dorothy Jeanette Lund nee Mitchell
nee Canfield

 
York Policeman C B Mitchell
with grandchildren
Walter L Lund Jr and Virginia

 
Dorothy Virginia Dutton nee Lund
and Edward Jefferson Dutton
circa 1960

 
Dorothy Virginia Dutton with all
eight children (me and my siblings)

 

 
Ed and me with catch

 
Dorothy Virginia Lund at 6 yrs

 

I have some pictures of the three sets of ancestors preceding my GGGFs, but those are rserved for my family genealogy tree web site. The Canfield line was traced back to the early 1600s when they first emigrated to the colonies from England. One of them fought in the MacKenzie Rebellion in Canada after the American Revolutionary War ended. Many people do not know that many, loyal to the King of England, left the colonies for Canada prior to and during the Revolutionary War. Some stayed in Canada and some returned. Some Canfields went to Canada, others stayed and fought the Britisn.